Articles of Interest

CEPI - the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations

We want to stop future epidemics by developing new vaccines for a safer world.

Vaccines are one of the world’s most important health achievements. Yet their life-saving potential hasn’t yet been realised for many known and unknown epidemic threats, particularly in low-income countries, where the risks and needs are often greatest...


A Global Plan to Defend Against the Future's Deadliest Diseases

$460 million will go toward developing vaccines that prevent outbreaks like Ebola from taking the world by surprise.

The closing days of 2016 brought great news: The world now has an Ebola vaccine that’s 100 percent effective at preventing infections from the strain behind the recent west African outbreak...


U.S. Travelers Skip Measles Vaccines, Study Finds

More than half of U.S. adults who should get vaccinated against measles before traveling abroad don’t do it, a new study suggests. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine for adults traveling outside the U.S. who were born before 1957 and lack either a documented measles infection, records of adequate vaccination or a positive blood test for immunity to measles. ...



Six Things YOU Need to Know about Vaccines

1. We all need vaccines throughout our lives to help protect against serious diseases. Every year, tens of thousands of Americans get sick from diseases that could be prevented by vaccines - some people are hospitalized, some even die. Immunization is our best protection against these diseases. Vaccines are recommended for children, teens, and adults based on different factors like age, health conditions, lifestyle, jobs, and travel...


Vaccine Vision

A broad family of room temperature stable vaccines self administered via a painless patch...

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Featured Article
Featured Team Member

Marc Gurwith, MD, JD
Vice President of Clinical Affairs

Marc was Chief Medical Officer at Paxvax from 2007 to 2015, and Senior Vice President, Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer at Vaxgen from 2001-2007. In these two positions Marc ran clinical trials for vaccines aimed at influenza, anthrax and HIV. Marc has held similar positions at Genelabs, Sequus, Boeheringer-Mannheim and Wyeth Ayerst. Marc received his BA. magna cum laude from Yale, his M.D. cum laude from Harvard and his J.D. from Temple. Marc has authored over 100 scientific journal articles.

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